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  • SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 FAQ

    Mar 31, 2020

    FAQ

    1. How do I know which disinfectants to use against SARS-CoV-2?

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided a list of recommended and approved disinfectants for our fight against COVID-19 through the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. You can view the list—called List N—by clicking here.

    2. Why doesn’t Betco have any products on List N?

    As stated in List N’s introductory text, "these products may be marketed and sold under different brand names, but if they have the same EPA registration number, they are the same product. " These are known as supplemental, secondary, or sub-registrations.

    As of March 31, 2020, Betco® has 8 such products. We have isolated them for your reading convenience in a Betco-only version, which you can download by clicking here.

    All disinfectant product labels must include the EPA registration number. For secondary registrations, a company EPA ID follows the registration number, which is why Betco's ID—4170—appears after the EPA registration number on our labels.

    3. How does the EPA know these products work against SARS-CoV-2? 

    Because SARS-CoV-2 is such a new virus, it is not available commercially for laboratory testing. The EPA expects these disinfectants to be effective against SARS-CoV-2 based on:

    • Demonstrated efficacy against a harder-to-kill virus
    • Demonstrated efficacy against another human coronavirus similar to SARS-CoV-2
    • Qualification for the emerging viral pathogens claim

    4. What is an emerging viral pathogen claim?

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases defines emerging infectious diseases/pathogens as those “that have newly appeared in a population or have existed but are rapidly increasing in incidence or geographic range.” Many of the emerging pathogens of greatest concern are pathogenic viruses, and the ability of some of these viruses to persist on environmental surfaces can play a role in human disease transmission. SARS-CoV-2 is such a pathogenic virus.

    Because the occurrence of emerging viral pathogens is less common and predictable than established pathogens, few if any EPA-registered disinfectant product labels specify use against this category of infectious agents. Therefore, in 2016, EPA provided a voluntary, two-stage process to enable use of certain EPA-registered disinfectant products against emerging viral pathogens not identified on the product label.

    A company can apply for an emerging viral pathogen claim, even before an outbreak occurs, based on previous EPA-approved claims for harder-to-kill viruses.

    The emerging viral pathogen guidance was triggered for SARS-CoV-2 on Jan. 29, 2020. EPA reviews the supporting information and determines if the claim is acceptable. Once approved, a company can make certain off-label claims as specified in the policy in the event of an outbreak such as SARS-CoV-2. For instance, the company can include an efficacy statement on:

    • Technical literature distributed to health care facilities, physicians, nurses, and public health officials
    • Non-label-related websites
    • Consumer information services
    • Social media sites

    5. Why are there no skin care products on list N? / Can skin care products make COVID-19 claims? 

    List N only includes EPA-registered surface disinfectants. Hand sanitizers, antiseptic washes, and antibacterial soaps are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). EPA-registered surface disinfectants, including surface wipes, SHOULD NOT be applied on your skin or ingested.

    Only products approved as pharmaceutical drugs can legally make COVID-19 claims, not over-the-counter topical anesthetics, which skin care products are considered. The CDC recommends washing hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. It does not differentiate between different types of soaps (antibacterial or plain soap). When soap and water is unavailable use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

    6. What is the difference between disinfectants, sanitizers, and cleaners?

    Cleaners use soap or detergents to physically remove dirt, dust, other soils. While cleaners do not kill germs, they do remove them. Cleaners are not regulated or tested by the EPA.

    Sanitizers reduce bacteria on a surface by at least 99.9%, while disinfectants kill bacteria, viruses, mold, mildew, and fungi. Both sanitizers and disinfectants are regulated and tested by the EPA and must be proven efficacious for specific germs.

    7. How do I use disinfectants against coronavirus?

    The CDC recommends pre-cleaning surfaces before using a disinfectant.

    All disinfectant label instructions should be followed carefully, especially with regard to:

    • Dwell time, or amount of time that the surface must stay wet to ensure that germs are killed
    • Concentration, as some products may need to be diluted before use
    • Application method, including whether to use a sponge, paper towel, microfiber cloth, etc.
    • Personal protective equipment and other safety considerations
    • Suitability for use on different types of surfaces (see question #9 below)

    8. Can I use disinfectants in an electrostatic sprayer, fogger, or mister?

    In order for a disinfectant to remain effective, it has to be applied as a wet spray. Most disinfectants recommend a coarse wet spray. This can be achieved by use of a spray bottle, pump up sprayer, or an electrostatic sprayer. The key is that the particle size of the droplets has to be greater than 80 microns, and most electrostatic sprayers are 80–150 microns. Check the specific disinfectant label for further instructions on use in these machines.

    Foggers/misters create a thick fog or—in the case of thermal (heat) foggers—steam and use very little product. This is an insufficient delivery system for disinfectants.

    9. What surfaces should I disinfect?

    All reachable hard, non-porous surfaces can be disinfected, but high-touch surfaces should be paid special attention. These include but are not limited to tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

    The World Health Organization says studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 may last for a few hours or several days on surfaces, depending on the kind of surface, temperature, and humidity. Under the conditions in at least 1 experiment, the virus remained active on plastic and stainless steel for 2–3 days.

    Not all disinfectants are appropriate for use on medical devices or food-contact surfaces. Disinfectants that are suitable for use on these surfaces may, furthermore, require additional actions, such as rinsing after disinfection. This information will be located on the product label.

    10. What about soft or porous surfaces, like carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes?

    No disinfectant can claim to disinfect soft surfaces. You may, however, sanitize with an EPA-registered soft surface sanitizer, such as Betco’s Triforce Disinfectant and Soft Surface Sanitizer, according to label directions.

    You may also clean soft surfaces with soap and water or a suitable cleaner, then launder if possible (see question #11 below).

    According to Juan Dumois, a pediatric infectious-diseases physician, “In general coronaviruses last a lot longer on hard non-porous surfaces compared to porous surfaces.”

    11. How should I do laundry with regard to SARS-CoV-2?

    Clothing, towels, linens, and similar articles should be laundered using manufacturer’s directions in the warmest suitable water and be completely dry before use. Items used by an infected person can be washed with other items.

    Dirty laundry should not be shaken to avoid releasing the virus into the air and should only be handled when wearing disposable gloves. Wash hands with soap and water immediately after removing the gloves.

    Remember to pre-clean and disinfect hampers according to label instructions.

    12. How should I disinfect electronics?

    First, always check with the manufacturer of the electronics to see if there are any explicit requirements or specifications. To apply disinfectant to most electronics, spray the disinfectant onto a microfiber cloth or towel, do not oversaturate the fabric, then wipe the surface and allow to air dry.  Never spray directly on electronics.

    13. What precautions should I take when cleaning/disinfecting?

    If someone in a facility is sick, all areas they have used should be closed off, with any outside doors and windows opened to increase air circulation. Wait 24 hours or as long as possible before cleaning and disinfecting all areas and surfaces used by the sick person.

    Whether a sick person has used an area or not, always wear disposable gloves and gowns for the entire cleaning and disinfecting process, including handling trash. After you carefully remove these items, immediately wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. If hands are not visibly dirty and soap and water are unavailable, you may use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

    Additional personal protective equipment (PPE), such as safety glasses, might be need based on the cleaning/disinfectant products being used and whether there is a risk of splash. Always consult product labels and ensure proper ventilation of the area.

    Never mix bleach with any other chemicals.

     

    Click here to visit our dedicated SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 web page, which has more crucial information and resources.

  • Hit the Contact Cleaning Jackpot with New Smart Tools™

    Feb 28, 2020

    Building Service Contractors account for 30% of sales across the commercial cleaning industry. Both contract cleaners and the distributors who service them can win more business with the new Smart Tools™ program from Betco®, a toolbox of targeted solutions guaranteed to produce the results BSCs need to be successful.


    By reducing account turnover and increasing customer satisfaction, Smart Tools addresses contract cleaners' pain points and adds value to their businesses with a combination of:

    • High-performing cleaning and maintenance products
    • Innovative equipment and service
    • iBet®, the industry's best learning and development platform

    Whether office, grocery, retail, education, or industrial, Betco helps BSCs enhance the health and cleanliness of every facility. Click here to learn more.

  • Learn About the History of Cleaning

    Feb 26, 2020

    Part of our 70th anniversary visual series, this timeline explores the development of cleaning agents from ancient times to the modern day.

    History of Cleaning Infographic

  • Your Leg up for LVT and All Alternate Flooring Types

    Jan 27, 2020

    Elevate™ Multiple Surface System maintains, protects, and extends the life of alternate flooring types, like LVT, UP TO 25% with only 3 products!


    Reinforce neutral cleaner and protectant continually repairs abrasions in the wear layer with daily use but does not build up on the surface, keeping floors cleaner longer.

    Rescue finish available in Gloss and  TruMatte boasts best-in-class adhesion to provide the ultimate protection for the wear layer against the ravages of everyday use.

    Highly effective Recover finish remover is proven safe for use on all no/low-maintenance floors without any risk of discoloration*, and it reduces labor.

    Elevate is the ONLY SOLUTION YOU NEED to catapult LVT, vinyl tile, linoleum, rubber, and laminate floors to the next level. Click here to learn more.

    *When used as directed
  • Cheers to 70 Years

    Jan 24, 2020

    70th Anniversary Mini Video Series - Part 1 from Betco Corporation on Vimeo.

  • 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China

    Jan 21, 2020

    outbreak-coronavirus-china-2019

    This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation, and CDC will provide updated information as it becomes available, in addition to updated guidance.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is closely monitoring an outbreak caused by a novel coronavirus in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. Worldwide, there have been hundreds of confirmed human infections—including in the U.S.—and several deaths reported. For the most up-to-date statistics, please consult the CDC's website. A number of countries, such as the U.S., are actively screening incoming travelers from the Far East.

    Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals—including camels, cats and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can evolve and infect people and then spread between people, such as has been seen with MERS and SARS. Past MERS and SARS outbreaks have been complex, requiring comprehensive public health responses.

    There is much more to learn about how the virus (2019-nCoV) spreads, severity of associated illness, and other features of the virus. Investigations are ongoing. Based on current information, however, the immediate health risk from 2019-nCoV to the general American public is deemed to be low at this time. Nevertheless, the CDC is taking proactive preparedness precautions.

    The following information is for Common Human Coronaviruses:

    Symptoms of human coronavirus may include:

    • Runny nose
    • Headache
    • Cough
    • Sore threat
    • Fever

    The transmission method when spread from an infected person to others:

    • The air by coughing or sneezing
    • Close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands
    • Touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes before washing your hands
    • Rarely, fecal contamination

    Usually infections occur in the fall and winter, although there is a possibility of infection throughout the year.

    Best prevention measures include:

    • Staying home when sick
    • Avoiding close contact with others
    • Cleaning and disinfecting objects and surfaces
    • Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, discarding the tissue, and washing your hands with soap and water—or, when soap and water are unavailable, using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing a minimum of 60% alcohol as recommended by the CDC.

    Betco® Advanced Alcohol Hand Sanitizer is a new formula that contains 70% alcohol. Though tough on germs, this sanitizer is gentle on hands, thanks to added aloe that moisturizes and conditions:

    • Advanced Alcohol Foaming Sanitizer

    4 - 1 Gal. Bottles Item #79504-00
    6 - 1000 mL Clario Bags Item #79529-00
    24 - 50 mL Foaming Item #79553-00
    6 - 550 mL Foaming Pump Bottles Item #79557-00
    4 – 750 mL Compass Bottles Item #795C3-00
    2 – 1250 mL Compass Bottles Item #795C5-00

    • Advanced Alcohol Gel Sanitizer

    12 - 900 mL BIB Item #79619-00
    6 - 1000 mL Clario Bags Item #79629-00
    6 - 550 mL Foaming Pump Bottles Item #79657-00

    The following Betco® disinfectants have proven efficacy against the human coronavirus (10-minute kill claim unless otherwise noted):

    • Symplicity™ Sanibet™ Multi-Range Sanitizer (at Hospital Disinfectant dilution)

    4 - 1 Gal. Bottles Item #23704-00
    5 Gal. Pail Item #23705-00
    2.5 Gal. BIB Item #23725-00
    4 - 2 L Fast Draw Item #23747-00
    55 Gal. Drum Item #23755-00
    2 - 2 L Fast Draw Item #237B2-00

    • Betco® Pine Quat Cleaner, Disinfectant, and Deodorant

    4 - 1 Gal. Bottles Item #30404-00
    5 Gal. Pail Item #30405-00
    55 Gal. Drum Item #30455-00

    • Fight-Bac® RTU Broad Spectrum Disinfectant Cleaner (2 minutes)

    12 - 32 oz. Bottles Item #31112-00
    55 Gal. Drum Item #31155-00

    • pH7Q Neutral pH Disinfectant, Detergent, and Deodorant (1 minute)

    4 - 1 Gal. Bottles Item #31604-00
    5 Gal. Pail Item #31605-00
    55 Gal. Drum Item #31655-00

    • Triforce Disinfectant (3 minutes)

    4 - 1 Gal. Bottles Item #33304-00
    4 - 2 L Fast Draw Item #33347-00

    • Quat-Stat™ 5 Alkaline Disinfectant (5 minutes)

    4 - 1 Gal. Bottles Item #34104-00
    4 - 2 L Fast Draw Item #34147-00
    6 - 32 oz. Dosing Bottles Item #34148-00
    55 Gal. Drum Item #34155-00

    • pH7Q Dual Concentrated Neutral Disinfectant Cleaner

    4 - 1 Gal. Bottles Item #35504-00
    4 - 2 L Fast Draw Item #35547-00
    55 Gal. Drum Item #35555-00

    There are no specific treatments for illnesses caused by human coronavirus. Rest, drink plenty of liquids, and take fever medications. If symptoms persist, you should see your healthcare provider.

    Visit the CDC's website for more information.

     

  • The Scrubber You've Been Waiting for

    Jan 21, 2020

    The official launch of our new mid-size walk-behind auto scrubber series marks the GeneSys™ of a new era!

    genesys thumb

    The next generation of cleaning systems, GeneSys performs cleaning and project work at staggering speeds with previously unimaginable ease and cost-efficiency, thanks to:

    Best-in-Class Performance Specifications
    • 33% more horsepower*
    • 36% more RPMs*
    • 50% more down pressure**

    Smart, Problem-Solving Technologies
    SoliChem™: First-ever on-board solid chemical dispensing system reduces chemical costs up to 80%
    EfficiencyIQ™: Smart, labor-saving program automatically selects the most efficient settings to maximize daily cleaning productivity
    Fortify™: Suite of asset-protection features and technologies reduce the cost of ownership while extending machine life

    With this unveiling, the game has officially changed. Click here to learn more about THE scrubber everyone will want. 

    *Versus leading disk scrubber competitor
    **Versus leading disk and orbital scrubber competitors
  • This Year's Flu Disproportionately Affecting Children

    Jan 17, 2020

    flu stats
    (click to enlarge)

    For handwashing to be maximally effective against the flu virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend following this process:

    1. Wet your hands with clean, running water, turn off the tap, and apply soap.
    2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to clean all surfaces on your hands (backs of your hands, between your fingers, under your nails, etc.).
    3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds.
    4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
    5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

    During scrubbing, the World Health Organization has outlined the following steps:

    1. Rub your hands together, palm to palm.
    2. Rub the back of each hand with the palm of the opposite hand with fingers interlaced.
    3. Again, rub palm to palm, but this time with fingers interlaced.
    4. Rub the backs of your fingers using opposing palms with fingers interlocked.
    5. Rub around each thumb with the palm of the opposing palm.
    6. Finally rub the palm of each hand with fingers of the opposing hand.

    By using this model for hand hygiene, you can protect yourself and others—especially children—from the spread of germs.

    To view Betco’s comprehensive line of flu-fighting hand soaps, please click here.

  • NEW VersiFect™ Does It All

    Dec 03, 2019

    The unparalleled versatility of new peroxide-based, non-toxic VersiFect™ simplifies cleaning to save on labor time and cost!

    VersiFectProducts

    • Versatile uses: Disinfects, cleans, and deodorizes
    • Versatile kill claims: 13 organisms with 10-minute contact time
    • Versatile surfaces: Safe on most non-porous surfaces, including equipment

    Don't just disinfect . . . VersiFect! Click here to learn more about this hospital-grade disinfectant. 

  • How to Slow the Spread of Infection: An Infographic

    Dec 02, 2019

    blog header

    blog body

  • Alleviate Squeeze Tube Laundry Dispenser Woes...

    Nov 11, 2019

    Evoclean...by offering a dispensing system without squeeze tubes!

    New EvoClean laundry dispensing system has no squeeze tubes and reduces cost of ownership by:
    • Eliminating expensive maintenance
    • Minimizing end-user down time
    • Improving chemical dosing accuracy
    • Curtailing rewash and reclaiming
    • Reporting key performance metrics

    Ready to leverage Evoclean to ensure linens are ever-clean? Click here to learn more.

  • Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Manually Mixing Chemicals

    Oct 29, 2019

    IMG_4996

    Introduction
    Manually mixing concentrated chemicals with water—also known as the “glug glug” method—is a practice that still permeates the commercial cleaning and maintenance industry today. Every facility has unique needs, but improper dilution of chemicals in any environment not only results in ineffective and inconsistent outcomes, but furthermore is costly and even dangerous.

    Improper dilution of chemicals can lead to unsightly streaks on glass, sticky residue on carpet (which causes rapid resoiling), or permanent damage of sensitive surfaces like aluminum and marble. It could also expose patrons of a restaurant to foodborne illness, increase slip and fall accidents in the aisles of a grocery store, or leave patients in a hospital vulnerable to infection.

    Clearly, it is of critical importance to properly mix concentrated cleaning solutions, and the first step in doing so is to consult the product label for the dilution ratio. If a product is multi-purpose, the label will often indicate different dilution ratios for different applications, so it is important to select the appropriate ratio for the task at hand.

    Dilution Ratios and Ounces per Gallon
    Dilution ratios are written as 2 numbers separated by a colon. The number to the left of the colon represents the amount of concentrated chemical, while the number to the right of the colon represents the amount of water. For example:
    ratio diagram
    In this example, the dilution ratio can be verbally expressed as 1 part chemical to 32 parts water.

    In place of or in addition to the dilution ratio, the label may supply the number of ounces of concentrated chemical per gallon of water.

    If given the dilution ratio only, ounces per gallon may be calculated by dividing 128 (the number of ounces in a gallon) by the amount of water (the number to the right of the colon). In continuing with our previous example of a 1:32 dilution ratio:

    128 (ounces in a gallon) ÷ 32 = 4 ounces per gallon of water

    If given ounces per gallon only, the dilution ratio may be calculated by dividing 128 by the recommended number of ounces per gallon. The quotient is the number of parts water to 1 part chemical, and as such goes to the right of the colon. For example, if a label indicates 4 ounces per gallon:

    128 (ounces in a gallon) ÷ 4 = 32, or a dilution ratio of 1:32

    Other Units of Volume
    If you would like to calculate ounces of concentrated chemical per a different amount of water, simply swap 128 for the appropriate number of ounces:
    • 10 gallons = 1280 ounces
    • 5 gallons = 640 ounces
    • 1 gallon = 128 ounces
    • 1 quart = 32 ounces
    • 1 pint = 16 ounces
    • 1 cup = 8 ounces

    For example, if you want to know how much concentrated chemical to use with a quart of water, and the dilution ratio is 1:32:

    32 (ounces in a quart) ÷ 32 = 1 ounce per quart of water

    To download a chart with ounces per gallon for common dilution ratios, click here.

    The Metric System
    If calculating milliliters per liter from dilution ratio or dilution ratio from milliliters per liter, the same logic holds. Using a dilution ratio of 1:32:

    1000 (milliliters in 1 liter) ÷ 32 = 31.25 milliliters per liter

    1000 (milliliters in 1 liter) ÷ 31.25 = 32, or a dilution ratio of 1:32

    If conversion between metric and imperial is necessary, here are some common metric volume equivalents:
    • 1 ounce = 29.6 milliliters
    • 1 cup = 236.6 milliliters
    • 1 pint = 473.2 milliliters
    • 1 quart = 946.4 milliliters (or 0.9464 liters)
    • 1 gallon = 3.8 liters (or 3785.4 milliliters)
    • 5 gallons = 18.9 liters (or 18927.1 milliliters)
    • 10 gallons = 37.9 liters (or 37854.1 milliliters)
    • 33.8 ounces = 1 liter (or 1000 milliliters)

    Real-World Applications
    Most of the time, the ready-to-use solution will go into a receptacle with an actual volume that is slightly greater than the advertised volume. For example, a 5-gallon pail really holds approximately 5.75 gallons. For this reason, it is often easiest and most expedient to use 5 gallons of water plus the appropriate amount of concentrated chemical, even though this results in more than 5 gallons. Using our familiar 1:32 dilution ratio example:

    4 (ounces of concentrated chemical per gallon of water) x 5 (gallons of water) = 20 ounces of concentrated chemical

    20 (ounces of concentrated chemical) + 5 (gallons of water) = 5 gallons, 20 ounces of ready-to-use solution

    The total volume of 5 gallons, 20 ounces will usually not be a problem.

    If, however, an exact amount of ready-to-use solution is required, then click here to download and use a chart that takes this into account.

    Cost per Diluted Gallon
    Finally, it may be useful to calculate cost per diluted gallon.

    For this calculation, the parts concentrated chemical and water expressed in the dilution ratio must be added together. For our 1:32 dilution ratio:

    1 + 32 = 33 parts

    Then divide the concentrated chemical’s cost per gallon by the total parts. For example, if the cost is $10.00 for 1 gallon of concentrated chemical:

    $10.00 ÷ 33 (total parts) = $0.30 per diluted gallon

    Safety
    When manually mixing chemical, it is important to always add water before you add the concentrated chemical in order to minimize chemical splash and foam. As with any chemical, always read the Safety Data Sheet before use and be sure to wear the proper PPE, such as gloves and eye protection.

    If you would like to avoid the hassle and safety risks associated with manually mixing chemicals, Betco® offers several closed dilution control systems that consistently provide the correct dilution for cleaning staff. Learn more here.  

     

  • To Coat or Not to Coat; That Is the Question!

    Sep 25, 2019

    Concrete Floor

    No longer reserved for manufacturing plants and warehouses, concrete flooring has been infiltrating retail stores, trendy hotels and restaurants, offices, and even homes over the past 15 years. With concrete’s relative ease of maintenance and long-term cost savings, combined with its durability and versatility of aesthetic, it’s little wonder that this flooring solution is continuing to grow in popularity.

    For all its advantages, however, the comparative ease with which both polished and non-polished concrete stains and chemically etches is a definite disadvantage. In order to combat this issue, three types of products have been developed.

    1. High-solids topical coatings have been widely rejected, due to their insufficient adhesion to the substrate and failure when there is high vapor drive.
    2. Guards are not susceptible to the same vapor drive and adhesion problems. Guards are also known as semi-topical coatings/sealers, because while they sit on top of the concrete surface, they also lightly fill in its surface pores. Guards successfully protect concrete floors from stain and etch, while also creating gloss on non-polished surfaces and augmenting gloss on polished surfaces. Their primary drawback, however, is the need to recoat due to wear. The number and frequency of recoats required is largely dependent on environment in which they are used, particularly foot and/or wheel traffic.
    3. Penetrating sealers, as indicated in the name, fill in surface pores to prevent stain and etch. When using a penetrating sealer, none of the product remains on the surface of the concrete, unlike topical and semi-topical coatings. This penetration means that foot and/or wheel traffic, stain- and etch-causing substances, as well as sealant-infused cleaning and burnishing pads make direct contact with the concrete surface, instead of with a coating. This is the reason penetrating sealers are somewhat less effective against stain and etch than guards, but it is also the reason penetrating sealers wear less and require fewer reapplications than guards.

    The Betco® Crete Rx™ system offers both a penetrating sealer in the form of our Stain Defense product, as well as a new guard in the form of our LiquiShield product. Wondering which product may be right for your concrete or terrazzo floor?

    LiquiShield performs best in these applications:

    • Floors that require heavy stain protection, such as cafeterias
    • Providing gloss and protection to non-polished concrete floors
    • Terrazzo floors that cannot be polished due to:
      -Bleed off from divider strips (zinc, aluminum, brass, or PVC)
      -Topical dyes that bleed when dry polished
      -Non-cementitious terrazzo
    • Combination floors with topical guard/penetrating sealer for quick and easy avoidance of tedious edge work:
      -Polish the floor using the Crete Rx system
      -Apply LiquiShield along the edge, 3–4 inches wide, and it will shine like the rest of the floor
      -With little-to-no wear at the edges, LiquiShield will last for many years using the Crete Rx daily cleaning program
    Stain Defense penetrating sealer performs best in these applications:
    • Floors with very heavy traffic, such as grocery and retail floors or warehouse floors exposed to heavy forklift traffic
    • Floors that require an extremely high DOI (distinctness of image)
    • Floors that require high levels of scuff and scratch resistance
    • Lowering annual maintenance costs associated with annual and/or semi-annual recoats
    Characteristics LiquiShield Stain Defense
    Initial gloss rating Excellent Excellent
    Clarity of image Good Excellent
    Wear and durability in average traffic Good Excellent
    Wear and durability in heavy traffic Fair Excellent
    Scuff and scratch resistance rating Good Excellent
    Stain and etch protection rating Excellent Good
    Annual recoat maintenance required Yes No

  • The Best Online Training in the Industry Is Getting Even Better

    Sep 11, 2019

    Training is an essential component of the Betco® total solutions bundle and an integral part of our mission to deliver Professional Performance, Everyday. We strive to deliver the most up-to-date and engaging training content for all our customers.

    OSHA Safety and Health Training is required by law for a majority of users of Betco products, and we are excited to unveil our new OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen video, which is also available in Spanish.

    OSHA bloodborne


    Don't forget, the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Learning Module on Betco U has also been updated. Log in on your desktop here or access via the iBet® app.

    Don't have iBet® yet? Download it from the App Store or Google Play today!
  • Introducing LiquiShield and LiquiStrip

    Sep 05, 2019

    stackedWith NEW LiquiShield and LiquiStrip, achieving better looking polished concrete and terrazzo floors with Betco® Crete Rx™ is easier, quicker, and more economical than ever!

    LiquiShield is a water-based guard formulated to improve gloss while adding substantial protection against stain and etch.
    • Just two coats needed
    • No need for floor finish or conventional coatings
    • Avoid tedious edge work
    • Resists scuffs, black marks, and soil
    • Will not peel, flake, or discolor
    • Low odor

    Wondering when to use a coating? Download our guard versus polish sheet!

    LiquiStrip is a water-based stripper formulated to remove permanent, non-strippable guards and coatings without the use of diamond tooling. 
    • Concentrated solvents easily remove even the hardest guards and coatings
    • Leaves floors clean, film-free, and ready for new layers of guard or coating
    • Low odor
    • Non-flammable

    Ready to be floored by the results? To learn more about LiquiShield, click here. To learn more about LiquiStrip, click here.

  • Provide Ultimate Protection with NEW Advanced Hand Sanitizer

    Aug 23, 2019

    Did you know that hands are the #1 way that germs transfer from person to person? New Advanced Hand Sanitizer from Betco® provides the ultimate protection, killing 99.999% of illness-causing germs in just 8 seconds. Now with aloe, it also moisturizes and conditions skin. Available in both foam and gel form and in a variety of sizes, Advanced Hand Sanitizer from Betco can fit the needs of any market. 

    Advanced Alcohol Foaming Sanitizer

    • Decrease HAIs and improve HCAHPS scores in healthcare settings. 
    • Improve attendance of students and teachers and increase dollars for schools. 
    • Safeguard productivity by lessening sick days in office buildings. 
    • Stop the spread of foodborne illnesses in restaurants and grocery stores. 

    Increase the health and cleanliness of these and any other environment when soap and water are unavailable with Betco Advanced Hand Sanitizer. Learn More.

  • Why Are Disinfectants and Sanitizers Classified as Pesticides?

    Aug 19, 2019

    Pesticide-label

    The word “pesticide” appears on all of Betco’s disinfectant and sanitizer product labels and safety data sheets. 

    You may have noticed this language on safety data sheets:

    EPA Statement:
    This chemical is a pesticide product registered by the Environmental Protection Agency and is subject to certain labeling requirements under federal pesticide law. These requirements differ from the classification criterial and hazard information required for safety data sheets, and for workplace labels of nonpesticide chemicals. Below is the signal word as required on the pesticide label:

    Or you may have noticed directions for “Pesticide Storage” and “Pesticide Disposal” on product labels (click image below to enlarge).

    pesticide label

    So why are disinfectants and sanitizers listed as pesticides?  People often use the term "pesticide" to refer only to insecticides, but it actually applies to all the substances used to control pests.  Disinfectants and sanitizers—as well as insecticides, herbicides, swimming pool treatments, and even leaf defoliants—are managed by EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs.  Disinfectants and sanitizers kill bacteria, viruses, and fungi.  According to the EPA these are considered pests just as insects, weeds, snails, and slugs are considered pests.  Therefore, the EPA classifies disinfectants and sanitizers as pesticides.

    In addition, the EPA further classifies disinfectants as antimicrobial pesticides: “Intended to disinfect, sanitize, reduce or mitigate growth or development of microbiological organisms or protect inanimate objects, industrial processes or systems, surfaces, water or other chemical substances from contamination, fouling or deterioration caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime.”

    For more detailed information from the EPA, please click here or here.

    So, the term “pesticides” covers a large range of products, from your well-known insecticides and herbicides to less well-known disinfectants and sanitizers, and the inclusion of this term on product literature, including labels and safety data sheets, should not be considered cause for concern. Whether from Betco or a different chemical manufacturer, all disinfectants and sanitizers in the United States must be labeled as pesticides.

    All of Betco’s safety data sheets are up-to-date and available online. Simply click the “SDS” tab in the red navigation bar at the top of our website to access Safety Data Sheets for all products, or check the “SDS and Resources” section of each product page.

  • New Symplicity™ Built Detergent Offers Performance You Expect

    Aug 08, 2019

    49278-00_300x300_mainAn essential part of providing Professional Performance Everyday is listening to our customers. We heard your concerns about Symplicity™ Built Detergent Ultra, and we took them to heart. That's why we're replacing Symplicity Built Detergent Ultra with Symplicity™ Built Detergent.

    New Symplicity Built Detergent reflects our continued commitment to delivering simple, safe, and high-performing cleaning technologies that enhance the value of your operation.

    Uniquely designed to prolong linen life, Symplicity Built Detergent is compatible with the complete Betco® laundry product line.
    • Stable surfactants banish heavy soils for a one-wash clean
    • Anti-redesposition agents prevent dulling
    • Optical brighteners enhance whiteness
    • No need for a break or builder for most applications
    • Effective over broad range of temperatures and water conditions

    Experience the difference for yourself. Learn more.
  • Introducing Mobile Inspector

    Aug 02, 2019
    Inspector

    Lock in business with ironclad quality assurance through mobile Inspector, now available on the Betco® iBet® app.

    You asked, we listened: mobile Inspector has been streamlined and simplified, making it easier, quicker, and more intuitive than ever to set up and implement a quality assurance program.

    Get the most out of cleaning programs and win with customers by guaranteeing a standardized clean with the highest efficiency and at the lowest cost. 

    • New and existing template creation in minutes
    • Measure level of clean by person, zone, or area
    • Allow users to perform scheduled or random inspections with customized rating scales
    • Provide notification to others of corrective actions needed
    • And more!

    Download the Betco® iBet® app from the App Store or Google PlayLearn more.

  • Floor Finish Troubleshooting Guide

    Jul 26, 2019

    Floor Finish

    Every facility deserves a first-place finish, but there are a lot of ways to get off track. If you've got floor finish problems, we've got answers. This troubleshooting guide lists common problems faced by those applying or maintaining floor finish, along with their causes and best solutions.

    Betco® offers a complete line of high-performing finishes to satisfy a variety of facility and maintenance program needs. Whether you have time constraints to maintain finishes properly or you want the highest appearance level, we have a floor finish for you.

    Problem  Cause Solution
    Streaked appearance of floor finish Too little polish in mop during application Scrub and recoat; do not overwork the mop. Avoid using wrung out mops.
    Use of dirty mop Be sure mop heads are washed thoroughly before applying finish. 
    Poor rinsing If residue has been left on the floor surface, or an alkaline stripper was not properly rinsed prior to applying floor finish, re-stripping of the floor will be required.
    Finish too thick Apply each coat evenly and thinly. If a coat is applied too thickly, dry buff with a blue pad and recoat.
    Recoating too soon before prior coat has dried properly If streaking appears after more than three coats of finish have been applied, the most likely cause is “cut in.” This occurs when the top coat of finish appears to be dry enough to apply the next coat, but there is still moisture trapped in the finish film. If this happens… stop. Do nothing further to the floor until it has had a chance to fully dry, then dry buff the surface with a polish pad and recoat.
    Poor leveling, spreading, or wetting of floor finish Floor finish applied over factory finish on new tile  

    Strip thoroughly, rinse, and reapply finish.

    Floor not adequately cleaned Stop…do not apply floor finish until you have followed the proper cleaning procedures.
    Floor not properly rinsed No floor finish will properly bond or spread over a floor which has an alkaline residue. Rinse floor if necessary, but apply finish only after you have a clean, dry floor.
    Poor initial gloss Not enough floor finish Apply a minimum of four to six coats of finish/sealer on all stripped floors.
    High floor porosity Be aware of this prior to applying your finish and apply one or two coats of sealer first.
    Poor after gloss Floor dirty Clean floor and rinse thoroughly, use a restorer and burnish to bring gloss back.
    Wrong pads or brushes used (usually too aggressive)  Use red pad for routine scrubbing, blue or green pad for deep scrubbing, and tan, coral or white pads for buffing. On uneven floors, an appropriate brush is recommended to restore gloss. Use a mop-on restorer and burnish or recoat with a thin coat of finish.
    Excessive amount of sand and grit on the floor Use mats, dust mop frequently, and remove grit outside doors. To restore gloss, use a mop-on restorer and burnish or scrub and recoat.
    Using an alkaline floor cleaner Use of an alkaline all-purpose cleaner or degreaser will cause finish to dull and may even leave a hazy film on the floor surfaces. Spray buffing or use of a mop-on restorer will bring back the gloss. Use a neutral cleaner for routine cleaning.
    Tacky or sticky Too much finish applied in too short a period; improper drying time Apply thin coats and allow to dry before applying subsequent coats. High humidity, low temperature, and stagnant air conditions require longer drying time.
    Finish applied over improperly rinsed floor Re-strip the floor with a no-rinse stripper.
    Sticking of chairs and other objects to freshly coated floors Too long a drying time, especially under high humidity conditions Normal dry time for most finishes is between 30-45 minutes. If the floor is not dry to touch in 30 minutes, a fan may be applied to provide air movement.
    Finish applied too heavy Strip the floor and start again with thin coats, allowing adequate drying time between coats.
    Washed-out appearance Too frequent cleaning without sufficient use of restorer/spray buff Check to be sure you are diluting your cleaning agent properly or reduce cleaning frequency. Rely more on dust mop treatments and review recommended cleaning schedules.
    Harsh cleaners Use neutral detergents that will not attack the finish film.
    Abrasive material Clean entrance mats. Dust mop frequently with water-based treated dust mop. Use less abrasive cleaning pads.
    Color bleeding Solvent cleaners or solvent finish Use neutral cleaners and water emulsion finishes. (Never use solvent products on resilient floors.)
    Harsh alkaline cleaners Bleeding is the transfer of color from the flooring to the clearing solution and represents an attack of the flooring. Do no use harsh cleaners. Rinse floor well.
    Color fading Direct sunlight Curtains, screens, or tinted glass will reduce the effect of sunlight on resilient floors.
    Strong cleaners Use neutral detergents.
    Excessive black marking Inadequate amount of floor finish Build up enough coats for a protective coating. Buff regularly to maintain high gloss.
    Powdering Poor film formation upon drying of the finish due to an alkaline residue on the floor Re-strip the floor and rinse thoroughly. Give the floor a final rinse of 3 oz. Mild Acid Detergent per gallon of water.
    Poor film formation due to cold temperature Minimum temperature for application is 50° F.
    Factory finish not stripped from new tile before finishing Thoroughly strip, rinse, and re-apply finish.
    Applying coats too thinly Apply in medium coats, approximately 2,500 to 3,000 square feet per gallon of finish (avoid wrung-out mops).
    Wrong buffing pads or brushes used Use less aggressive pads or brushes.
    Loss of gloss Use of hot water, solvents or harsh cleaners Use neutral cleaners in cold water.  Avoid highly alkaline cleaners or solvents on resilient flooring.
    Using dust mops treated with oil-based agents Strip top layers of finish. Apply floor finish and subsequently use only water-based dust mop treatment.
    Insufficient finish on mop during application Scrub and recoat, avoiding use of wrung out mops.  Apply finish at a rate of 2,500–3,000 square feet per gallon of finish.
    Conspicuous formation of traffic lanes Too little touchup of traffic lanes with new coats of finish Use touch-up techniques of feathering new coats into old coat of finish at the edge of traffic lanes. Recoat as required by traffic wear.
    Over-polishing of non-traffic areas Do not finish around furniture or near baseboards except when stripping the entire floor and refinishing.
    Yellowed film Infrequent stripping Apply less finish or strip more often. Preventative maintenance schedules should be followed.
    Recoating the entire floor every time floor is cleaned Don’t finish the non-traffic areas as often as the rest of the floor.
    Buffing, spray buffing, or burnishing without proper cleaning. Anytime a floor machine is used on a finish film, the floor must be totally clean first, otherwise dirt and soil will be driven into the finish film, giving it a yellow appearance.
    Mastic bleed Mastic bleed is caused by the glue used to put the tile down bleeding up through the cracks. Strip the affected area, use solvent to clean the excess glue, wash with detergent, rinse, and reapply floor finish.
    Water spotting Applying finish over an improperly rinsed floor Select a finish made to resist water spillage, particularly in areas subject to spillage. All finish will turn white if water is allowed to sit for 30 minutes or more.
    Scuffing of the finish Excessive scuffing under normal conditions for the floor A harder floor finish is recommended.
    Wrong scrubbing or buffing pads/brushes used Use the proper pad or brush for the floor finish.
    Scratching of the finish Excessive dirt and grit on floor Use entrance mats and dust mop frequently with a water-based dust mop treatment.
    Floor finish film is too thick from excessive recoating Deep scrub with a green or blue pad before recoating (maintain 4 to 6 coats).
    Not scrubbing or buffing often enough Identify and separate main from secondary traffic areas and schedule appropriate maintenance procedures for each based on traffic patterns.
    Wrong scrubbing or buffing pads/brushes used Use a pad or brush recommended for each maintenance procedure.

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